Jul 24 2014

Flathead ‘Bat BioBlitz’ may help Canada’s endangered bats

Published by under Environmental Issues,News

The Canadian Flathead, as well as the area immediately below the border, has hosted a number of bat studies in the past few years, including this most recent one…

Bat biologists are converging in B.C.’s Flathead River Valley tomorrow. They hope to gain new information to advance bat conservation in B.C.’s southeast and to ultimately minimize the impacts of White Nose Syndrome, a mysterious disease that has killed millions of North American bats.

The four-day Bat BioBlitz, organized by conservation groups in B.C. and Alberta and led by Wildlife Conservation Society Canada’s bat biologist, Dr. Cori Lausen, will build on an initial inventory of Flathead bats that Lausen conducted last summer during a BioBlitz. That inventory detected two species of bats in the Flathead that are considered federally Endangered by the Committee on Endangered Wildlife in Canada: little brown myotis and northern myotis.

“In the southeast corner of B.C., the Flathead may be the gateway for entry of White Nose Syndrome into B.C., and it is thus urgent to start monitoring bats in this area,” said Lausen. “Significant bat hibernation caves have never been found in B.C. and yet the Flathead is surrounded by karst and has the deepest cave in all of Canada.”

Read more . . .

No responses yet

Jul 23 2014

Forest road decommissioning winding down?

Published by under Environmental Issues,News

Looks like the Flathead National Forest might be just about done with decommissioning roads . . .

Over the past 10 years, the Flathead National Forest has decommissioned about 700 miles of roads. That might be nearly the last of them if recommendations contained in a recent draft study are followed.

Forest planners recently examined all 3,000 miles of roads spread across the 2.4 million acres of Flathead Forest land. The travel analysis looked at risks and benefits for each road and concluded that, in the future, only 54 miles of road would be considered for closing or no longer needed.

Most of that total is found in one road — Forest Road 2820, in the headwaters of Bunker Creek.

Read more . . .

No responses yet

Jul 23 2014

Bob Marshall’s legacy

Carol Treadwell, executive director of the Bob Marshall Wilderness Foundation, has a nice piece about Bob Marshall and the upcoming “Wilderness 50th” celebration in this week’s Hungry Horse News . . .

On the morning of Tuesday, Aug. 28, 1928, Bob Marshall departed Kalispell to embark on an eight-day hiking trip that would cover 288 miles and cross landmarks such as Mount Aeneus, White River Pass, the Chinese Wall, Big Prairie, Gordon Pass and Holland Pass and end at the Seeley Post Office.

Bob averaged 36 miles a day including “evening strolls” taken after dinner each evening.  Bob was 28 at the time and continued to put down epic hikes throughout his life and even courted gals who could match his stride for 20 miles.

His greatest life accomplishment, however, was to spearhead the public initiative for the protection of wild lands. In 1935, he helped form the Wilderness Society and was its first donor, contributing $1,000.

Read more . . .

No responses yet

Jul 23 2014

Picnick-raiding black bear killed by park rangers

Published by under Environmental Issues,News

Here is this year’s “a fed bear is a dead bear” story. Glacier Park had to kill a food-conditioned black bear in the Two Medicine area of the park . . .

Glacier National Park Rangers euthanized a black bear from the Two Medicine area on Friday, July 18, after several reports in which the bear exhibited apparent food-conditioned behavior, including an incident in which the bear charged a picnicking family.

On Thursday, July 17, the black bear approached a family that was eating at a picnic table at the Two Medicine Picnic Area. The family yelled and clapped hands, but the bear charged towards the table, and the family retreated to their vehicle. The bear consumed the food and left the area after a park ranger repeatedly hazed the bear with rubber bullets and bean bags.

This same black bear was observed digging in a fire pit in the area, and did not seem bothered by human presence. There were several sightings of the bear on and near to the park trail system along the shore of Two Medicine Lake. The bear was determined to be a food-conditioned bear, and a threat to human safety. Trail and picnic area closures were implemented in Two Medicine.

The bear was euthanized. This action is consistent with Glacier National Park’s Bear Management Plan. The male bear was approximately five years old and weighed approximately 225 pounds.

Read more . . .

No responses yet

Jul 22 2014

Grizzly relocated from Blackfeet Reservation to North Fork

Published by under Environmental Issues,News

As mentioned at the recent Inter Local meeting, Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks personnel helped relocate a nuisance grizzly to the Whale Creek drainage . . .

A grizzly bear captured on the Blackfeet Indian Reservation after it killed a calf was relocated to the Whale Creek drainage of the North Fork Flathead River.

On July 16, Blackfeet tribal biologists captured the 220-pound, 2-to-3 year-old-male grizzly bear at the site of a calf kill near the Montana and Alberta border.

Read more . . .

No responses yet

Jul 22 2014

Dave Hadden: North Fork bill caught up in Montana politics

Published by under Commentary,Environmental Issues

Well, this is a bit of a coup. If the following piece just posted to the Hungry Horse News looks familiar, that’s because you read it first in the recent NFPA Summer Newsletter.

Anyways, here is Dave Hadden’s take on the damage election year political posturing is doing to even the most broadly supported legislation . . .

Didn’t we all think that the international effort to protect the North Fork Flathead River from coal mining was all but done in 2013?

British Columbia had passed legislation in 2011 banning mining and energy development north of the border. And or the first time in some 20 years, Montana’s congressional delegation all supported a piece of conservation legislation — the North Fork Watershed Protection Act. The stars had finally aligned after 38 years of local, a-political effort to protect the North Fork.

Regretfully, it was not to be.

Read more . . .

No responses yet

Jul 20 2014

Frank Vitale receives Brass Lantern Award from MWA

Published by under News

Frank Vitale, a long-time member of the NFPA, received the Brass Lantern Award from the Montana Wilderness Association last Saturday. This award was given to recognize his outstanding contributions to wilderness advocacy.

The NFNews site also has an article on Frank’s award — with photos.

No responses yet

Jul 16 2014

Summer 2014 NFPA Newsletter online

For those of you who can’t wait on the mail, the North Fork Preservation Association Summer 2014 Newsletter is now available online in the “Newsletters” section of the website. Enjoy!

Here’s a partial table of contents:

  • The Second ‘Missing Piece Rendezvous’ Comes to the North Fork
  • The Whitefish Range Partnership
  • North Fork Bill Caught Up in Montana Politics
  • North Fork Hiking
  • Bears and Wolverines, Trees and Water, and That Facebook Thing
  • Hiking with Tools: Introducing the North Fork Trails Association

One response so far

Jul 13 2014

Biologists look for ways to preserve grizzlies after delisting

Published by under Environmental Issues,News

Once the feds remove the grizzly bear from the endangered species list, what happens then? . . .

The grizzly bear answers to a lot of names.

Biologists call it Ursus arctos. They also describe it as an “ecological engineer” or “keystone predator.”

Wordy members of the general public call grizzlies “charismatic megafauna.” Others call them “vermin.” While running for president in 2008, Arizona Sen. John McCain famously derided studying grizzlies as a classic example of “Washington, D.C., pork.”

McCain later apologized for misunderstanding the value of Montana grizzly bear researcher Kate Kendall’s DNA hair analysis…

Read more . . .

No responses yet

Jul 13 2014

What ‘completing’ Waterton Park would mean for Glacier Park and the North Fork

Published by under Environmental Issues,News

Harvey Locke’s presentation at the upcoming NFPA annual meeting gets a mention in this NPR piece . . .

Waterton-Glacier International Peace park connects over the US-Canada border between Montana and Alberta. However, the two parks don’t match up in their cross-border boundary.

Glacier Park stretches west to encompass the North Fork Flathead River Valley, but the Canadian Flathead is not part of the Park. The Canadian Flathead is Provincial land, akin to state or forest service land in the US, and offering the potential for logging or mineral development. Conservationists have been angling to “Complete the Park” by expanding Waterton into the North Fork Valley.

This idea of completing the Park is not new. Executive Director of Headwaters Montana Dave Hadden said it’s an effort about as old as the Park itself.

Read more . . .

No responses yet

« Prev - Next »