Tag Archives: dark skies

Waterton-Glacier becomes first ‘International Dark Sky Park’

Milky Way over Logan Pass in Glacier National Park - NPS, Jacob W. Frank
Milky Way over Logan Pass in Glacier National Park – NPS, Jacob W. Frank

Waterton-Glacier International Peace Park was just named the first trans-boundary International Dark Sky Park. Below is the lead-in from the Flathead Beacon’s article on the subject, but also check out the links following it for some spectacular photos . . .

Eighty percent of the United States’ population lives in an area where they can’t see a true dark sky. Around the globe, thanks to light pollution, only one-third of humanity can look up at the sky at night and clearly see the Milky Way.

For Glacier National Park interpretive ranger Lee Rademaker, that means every time the park prepares to host a night sky viewing, “we’re about to blow two-thirds of these people’s minds.”

For years, Glacier and nearby Waterton Lake National Park have been touting their dark night sky as another critical natural resource, just as important as glaciers or goats. On April 28, officials from the United States and Canada gathered at West Glacier to celebrate Waterton-Glacier International Peace Park being named the first trans-boundary International Dark Sky Park.

Read more . . .

Also see . . .
Glacier Park’s “Night Sky” page
In Search of America’s Darkest Skies (24 Photos)

What light pollution costs us every night

The Milky Way near the Grand Canyon - Bob Wick, BLM
The Milky Way near the Grand Canyon – Bob Wick, BLM

Astrophysicist and science writer Ethan Siegel has a great article on the importance and increasing rarity of dark skies. It’s a short read, but very informative, with lots of photos and data. Recommended reading . . .

If you don’t have pristine, dark skies, you might never connect to the Universe. But there’s hope.

Human vision is ill-adapted to true darkness, but our eyes can provide us with stellar views of the night sky. Since the invention of artificial lighting, however, our views of those natural wonders have diminished precipitously.

Read more . . .

A Montana perspective on the Milky Way

A very nice essay on “dark skies” posted to the Missoulian via the Billings Gazette . . .

When I stepped out from the canopy of trees along the Appalachian Trail into a meadow, I walked into a sea of lights.

Fireflies danced in the night above the midsummer grass. Their larval offspring — the glow worms — hung from the surrounding trees, and like spectators at a giant amphitheater, they watched their parents dance.

Above, stretched over the length of open field, the Milky Way blazed across the moonless night.

Read more . . .