Tag Archives: Montana FWP

FWP open house to consider wolf-hunt changes

Here’s some more information on the upcoming Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks “listening session” to discuss changes in wolf hunt regulations . . .

Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks will host an open house in Kalispell on Wednesday, June 13, to give information and answer questions on the proposed 2012-13 wolf hunting and trapping season.

The meeting will begin at 7 p.m. at the Flathead Valley Community College Arts and Technology Building. At the open house, people will break out into small groups to discuss details and work on comments regarding the proposals.

Under the wolf season proposals, the general season would run from Sept. 1, 2012, to Feb. 28, 2013, with trapping allowed from Dec. 15 to the end of the general wolf season. There would be no statewide quota, but quotas would be established in two areas near Glacier and Yellowstone National Parks.

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Montana FWP to hold public forum on proposed wolf rules

Here’s more information on the Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks effort to gather public feedback on this year’s proposed wolf hunting and trapping regulations. (For more background, see last week’s post.) . . .

Residents will have a chance to speak up about proposed changes to the wolf hunting and trapping season at a public gathering in Kalispell next week.

Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks is hosting an open house forum in the Science and Technology building at Flathead Valley Community College from 7 to 9 p.m. on June 13.

Wildlife officials will give a presentation on the proposed regulations that were recently approved by the state wildlife commission. Attendees will be able to ask questions and discuss the proposals further afterward.

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Public comment sought on wolf hunt proposal

Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks is gathering public feedback on this year’s proposed wolf hunting and trapping regulations. (Yes, that’s right, they are talking about allowing trapping this year.)

Most of these state-wide “listening sessions” were held on May 22, but there is one more scheduled for June 13, 7-9 p.m., at the Flathead Valley Community College, 777 Grandview Dr., Kalispell. The increased wolf quota and inclusion of trapping made earlier presentations fairly contentious, so expect the meeting in Kalispell to be lively.

Montana FWP also wants written public comment. Realistically, this is more effective than attending one of the meetings. Deadline for written comments is June 25. Send comments to FWP – Wildlife Bureau, Attn: Public Comment, P.O. Box 200701, Helena, MT 59620-0701. Call the FWP Wildlife Bureau at 406-444-2612 with any questions about the process.

For details on the proposed changes to Montana’s wolf hunting regulations, read FWP’s “Interested Persons Letter“.

You can also read the full press release online.

Public shows little agreement on wolf hunt

This report on a Region 2 “listening session” provides a peek behind the curtain at the current Montana FWP thinking about predator control and hunt quotas . . .

This fall’s Montana wolf hunt will face critics who say it’s too extreme and not extreme enough.

State Fish, Wildlife and Parks officials got a taste of the divide on Tuesday during a Missoula listening session. While not ready for formal public comments, Region 2 Supervisor Mack Long invited the roughly 50 people in the audience to lay out the issues that should be considered. They obliged.

“It’s not too late to turn things around, but we’ve got to do it quick,” Long said. “This is one of the most dynamic times we’ve ever seen in wildlife management.”

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Green cards for caribou?

Well, yet another Canadian caribou has wondered into Montana. Montana FWP found the last one and sent it home. This new one may be pregnant. Excitement all around . . .

Montana wildlife officials say a Canadian caribou has wandered into northwestern Montana for the second time this spring, and this one has the potential to make history.

Fish, Wildlife and Parks wildlife manager Jim Williams tells KCFW-TV the possibly pregnant cow is from a herd that biologists brought to British Columbia to augment an existing herd.

He says if the caribou gives birth, it would be the first known caribou birth in Montana in over 50 years.

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Deer and elk populations bouncing back in Northwest Montana

As well as being good news for hunters, this will no doubt add fuel to the debate about wolf population impact on big game . . .

Big game wildlife populations appear to be bouncing back in Northwest Montana after a few rough years, according to state Fish, Wildlife and Parks’ spring surveys.

The percentage of white-tail fawns that survived winter is the highest since 2006 in Region 1, according to FWP Wildlife Manager Jim Williams. Williams said the survey found an average of 44 fawns for every 100 adults. Last year, that number was 30/100. In 2009, it had dropped to 24/100. Mule deer and elk populations also gained ground in almost all areas, Williams said.

The latest population estimates are welcome news for hunters and FWP. Last fall, nearly every region in the state saw significant declines in both animals harvested and hunters in the field, supporting a widespread perception that big game populations, specifically deer, are on the decline.

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Montana FWP considering wolf-trapping season

There’s been some loose talk recently about introducing a wolf trapping season . . .

State wildlife managers want to substantially liberalize the 2012-13 wolf-hunting season in another attempt to decrease pack numbers in Montana.

Trapping wolves, allowing the taking of up to three wolves, using electronic calls, lengthening the hunt and eliminating quotas are among the proposals to be introduced at Thursday’s Fish, Wildlife and Parks Commission meeting.

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Another sign of spring: deer counting

Montana Fish Wildlife and Parks people are out in the field gathering data on deer populations . . .

Hunting deer in springtime resembles its fall cousin in everything but the weaponry: Get up before dawn, go far away from other people, creep quietly to avoid scaring the quarry.

The only difference is that the big scopes don’t have rifles attached. Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks biologist Jay Kolbe has his mounted to his pickup window. As the morning light shifts from blue to yellow, he drives from one patch of new grass to another, counting every whitetail adult and fawn he can spot.

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Young grizzly captured north of Columbia Falls; released in Whale Creek area

From the Flathead Beacon . . .

Wildlife officials captured a young male grizzly bear Friday in a residential area north of Columbia Falls, according to Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks.

The 4-year-old bear was caught in a trap set for a much larger grizzly that was getting into garbage in the area.

The young male was relocated Saturday in the Whale Creek area of the North Fork of the Flathead River drainage . . .

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Surprise caribou rescue

This is a pretty good story. Montana FWP thought they were going out to retrieve a dead caribou that wandered away from a Canadian herd. Instead, they ended up with a live Caribou on their hands . . .

What started out as an unusual hunt for a dead caribou that wandered south of Eureka from Canada turned out to be an animal  rescue mission Thursday for Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks biologists.

British Columbia wildlife officials notified the biologists Thursday morning that a recently transplanted cow caribou had wandered into the Pinkham Creek drainage, and its satellite collar was broadcasting a mortality signal that is triggered when the collar doesn’t move for six hours.

Jim Williams, the regional wildlife manager, teamed up with biologists Tim Thier and Tim Manley to retrieve the animal using snowmobiles.

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